Skip Navigation
Upcoming Exhibitions

Click here for the 2015-2016 Advance Exhibition Schedule

 

Oller

Impressionism and the Caribbean: Francisco Oller and His Transatlantic World
June 14 – September 6, 2015

Puerto Rican painter Francisco Oller (1833–1917) emerged from the small art world of San Juan in the1840s to become one of the most distinguished transatlantic painters of his day. Over the course of twenty years spent in Europe, Oller participated in pioneering movements such as Realism, Impressionism, and Naturalism. He carried the tenets and techniques of each style from Paris back to San Juan, revolutionizing the school of painting in his native Puerto Rico.

Organized by the Brooklyn Museum, Impressionism and the Caribbean celebrates Oller’s contributions to both the Paris avant-garde and the Puerto Rican school of painting. Placing his work within a larger artistic, geographic, and historical context, the exhibition also features paintings by Paul Cezanne, Winslow Homer, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro and other Impressionist masters.

Impressionism and the Caribbean: Francisco Oller and his Transatlantic World is organized by the Brooklyn Museum and co-curated by Richard Aste, Curator of European Art, Brooklyn Museum, and Edward J. Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of the History of Art, New York University. Generous support for the exhibition is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.

NEA


Natalie Frank

Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm
July 11 – November 15, 2015

Written between 1812 and 1857, the Grimm’s fairytales are known and loved by children the world over. What is less known is that these stories were originally intended for adults, with later editions expunged of their explicit sexuality and violence. Using the original, often graphic versions of these stories as a point of departure, artist Natalie Frank explores the intersection between body and mind, reality and fiction in forty gouache and chalk pastel drawings. Through Frank’s renderings, the stories’ eccentric symbols spring to life, challenging viewers’ imagination. 

Natalie Frank: The Brothers Grimm is organized by the Drawing Center, New York.

 

2015-2016 Advance Exhibition Schedule

The information provided here is accurate as of April 2015. Press may contact Kathleen Brady Stimpert, Director of Public Relations and Marketing at 512-475-6784 / .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) or Stacey Kaleh, Public Relations and Marketing Manager at (512) 471-8433 / .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for additional information and high-resolution images.

 

Moffett

Donald Moffett
October 24, 2015 – February 28, 2016

The Blanton currently has the greatest number of works by Donald Moffett of any museum in the United States. This fall, in celebration of the Blanton’s commitment to Moffett, a San Antonio native, the museum will present a gallery dedicated to new acquisitions by the artist in a rich variety of media including painting, drawing, and projected video on painting. The installation will illuminate Moffett’s diverse and influential practice. Highlights of the presentation include a suite of works that examine the legacy of Texas congressman Barbara Jordan to seductive and bold abstract paintings. This intimate exhibition is part of a growing initiative to increase the Museum’s holdings of Texas artists.

 

Moderno

Moderno: Design for Living in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela, 1940-78
October 11, 2015 – January 17, 2016

Moderno is the first exhibition entirely devoted to Latin American modern domestic design. It showcases how design deeply transformed the domestic landscape in Latin America during a period marked by major stylistic developments in art and architecture. The exhibition will make a lasting contribution to the understanding of modern Latin American visual culture by bringing together a group of innovative and beautiful objects that includes furniture, ceramics, glass, metalwork, textiles, and drawings—many of which will be exhibited for the first time. Beginning with the aftermath of World War II, when many Latin American countries entered an expansive period of economic growth, Moderno surveys a quarter-century of design for the home from Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. The selection includes one-of-a-kind as well as mass-produced furniture and household items that furnished homes in these three countries. Among the designers whose work will be featured in the exhibition are Sergio Rodrigues, Lina Bo Bardi, Joaquim Tenreiro, and José Zanine Caldas of Brazil; Don Shoemaker, Clara Porset, and Pedro Ramírez Vásquez of Mexico; and Miguel Arroyo and María Luisa Zuloaga de Tovar of Venezuela. The Blanton will show an expanded version of the exhibition, including paintings from the period.

The exhibition is organized by Americas Society, Inc., and made possible by the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council of the Arts; the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; PRISA/Santillana USA; Mercantil; SRE/AMEXCID – CONACULTA – INBA and the Mexican Cultural Institute of New York; Jaime and Raquel Gilinski; Mex-Am Cultural Foundation; Grupo DIARQ; and Furthermore: a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund.

 

Morgan Bible

The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece
December 12, 2015 – April 3, 2016

The Crusader Bible, from the collection of the Morgan Library in New York, is considered one of the most important and fascinating illuminated manuscripts in history. Likely created in Paris around 1250, the book is renowned for its unrivaled and boldly colored illustrations and for its incredible provenance. The Bible has been associated with the court of Louis IX, the pious crusader king of France and builder of the Sainte-Chapelle, and from Paris, made its way to Italy, Poland, Persia, Egypt, England, and finally, to New York. In the Blanton’s presentation, visitors will have an opportunity to view over forty unbound folios by seven anonymous artists. Old Testament stories are brought to life, through bright images of medieval castles, towns, and battling knights in armor, reflecting the world of the Crusades in thirteenth-century France. The book originally had no text, but later inscriptions were added in Latin, Persian, and Judeo-Persian, reflecting the manuscript's rich history.

This exhibition is organized by The Morgan Library & Museum, New York and made possible by the Janine Luke and Melvin R. Seiden Fund for Exhibitions and Publications; the Sherman Fairchild Fund for Exhibitions; James H. Marrow and Emily Rose; and the H. P. Kraus Fund. The curator of the exhibition at the Morgan is William Voelkle, Senior Research Curator, Department of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts, the Morgan Library & Museum.

 

Come As You Are

Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s
February 17 – May 15, 2016

Come As You Are: Art of the 1990s is the first major American museum survey to historicize the art of this pivotal decade. The exhibition showcases approximately 60 works in a diverse range of media by 45 artists including Janine Antoni, Byron Kim, Felix Gonzales-Torres, Nikki S. Lee, Fred Wilson and Kara Walker. The exhibition offers an overview of art made in the United States between 1989 and 2001—from the fall of Communism to 9/11—and is organized around three principle themes: the so-called “identity politics” debates; the digital revolution; and globalization. Its title refers to the 1992 song by Nirvana (the quintessential 90s band); moreover, it speaks to the issues of identity that were complicated by the effects of digital technologies and global migration. The artists in the exhibition made their initial “point of entry” into the art historical discourse during the 1990s and reflect the increasingly heterogeneous nature of the art world during this time when many women artists and artists of color attained unprecedented prominence.

This exhibition is organized by the Montclair Art Museum and made possible with generous support from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

 

Kelly Exterior

Ellsworth Kelly's Austin

This past February, the Blanton announced that it had acquired and will construct Ellsworth Kelly’s Austin, a 73 x 60 foot stone building to be sited on the grounds of the museum. The stand-alone structure, singular to Kelly’s career, comprises a 2,715-square-foot stone building with luminous colored glass windows, a totemic wood sculpture, and fourteen black-and-white stone panels in marble, all designed by the artist. Once constructed, the work will become part of the Blanton’s permanent collection.

Image captions:

Donald Moffett
Lot 102807X (Yellow), 2007
Acrylic polyvinyl acetate on linen and wall, with rayon and steel zipper, 72 x 72 in.
Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase through the generosity of Houston Endowment, Inc. in honor of Melissa Jones, with support from Jeanne and Michael Klein and Lora Reynolds and Quincy Lee, 2014. 

Miguel Arroyo
Coffee table, 1956
Wood, 13.8 x 47.1 x 44.5 in.
Producer: Pedro Santana, Carpintería Colectiva
Collection: Emilio Mendoza Guardia

Anonymous Artist
Rape and Death of the Levite’s Wife, MS M.638, fol. 16r (detail)The Crusader Bible, The Morgan Library & Museum
Purchased by J. P. Morgan, Jr., 1916.

Aziz + Cucher
Man with a Computer, 1992 (From the series Faith, Honor and Beauty)
C-Print                
85 1/4 x 36 1/4 in.
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Koch Contemporary Art Purchase Fund, 2012.126
Courtesy of the artists
© Aziz + Cucher

Ellsworth Kelly, Austin, 2015
Artist-designed building with installation of colored glass windows, marble panels, and redwood totem
60 ft. x 73 ft. x 26 ft. 4 in.
Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin
Gift of the artist, with funding generously provided by Jeanne and Michael Klein, Suzanne Deal Booth and David G. Booth, the Scurlock Foundation, Leslie and Jack S. Blanton, Jr., Elizabeth and Peter Wareing, and Kelli and Eddy S. Blanton
© 2015 Ellsworth Kelly
Image courtesy the Blanton Museum of Art